RI.K.8

With prompting and support, identify the reasons an author gives to support points in a text.

 


VOCABULARY
  • differences
  • illustration
  • points (key ideas)

  • reasons
  • similarities
  • author

  • informational text
  • support
  • identify

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD  what's this
  • Students who can identify the author’s reasons for making key points in informational text understand that authors write to tell stories, but also write for other reasons.
  • Students who can identify the author’s reasons for making key points can, with prompting and support, tell some of the reasons that authors write informational text: to give information about a person, an event or a thing; to describe something; to tell what happened in a real event; or to tell how something is alike or different from something else.
  • Students who can identify the author’s reasons for making key points practice using previously learned vocabulary (ideas, identify, describe, details, alike, and different. main idea, author, illustrator, illustrations, questions, and so forth) and begin to use new vocabulary such as: reasons, , important (key), information, real, and event.
  • Students who can identify the author’s reasons for making key points are able to identify key details and the main idea of informational text and use this information to help them identify the author’s reason for making key points.
  • Students who can identify the author’s reason for making key points recognize when the author makes connections between two things (individuals, ideas, information, events) in the text. Identifying these connections helps the student see relationships that are important to the author. Students use this information to help them identify key points and the author’s reason for making them.
  • With prompting and support, students use questioning to identify the author’s reason for making key points (i.e. In The Boy Who Loved to Draw (Barbara Brenner) the preacher predicted that Benjamin West would grow up to do great things some day. What was the author’s reason for telling us what the preacher predicted? How was Benjamin’s life great?” Source: Teacher Practices Related to Common Core State Standards for English Language Arts, Kindergarten.
  • Students who can identify the author’s reasons for making key points use illustrations within the text as well as prior knowledge to help them identify those reasons.
  • Identifying the author’s reasons for making specific points (or key ideas) prepares students to analyze informational texts of increasing complexity and rigor.
  • Being able to determine whether or not key ideas are supported by reasons or evidence strengthens students’ abilities to evaluate and use information from text.
  • Students who understand the author’s reasons for key points can use this knowledge in their writing in response to reading.
  • Students who understand the author’s reasons for key points can use this knowledge as they discuss the text and as they ask and answer questions.
  • Practice in “thinking about” (analyze) text supports reasoning in mathematics and science.
  • In identifying the author’s reasons, students learn they must refer to both words and illustrations in a piece of text.
  • Through the experience of identifying the author’s reasons for key points, students recognize that key points should be backed up with reasons.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION  what's this
  • What vocabulary word knowledge is necessary for students if they are to successfully meet this standard?
  • What are the reasons authors write non-fiction (e.g. to give information, to provide descriptions, to compare the characteristics of two or more things, to indicate what might cause certain events to happen)?
  • What must students know about identifying main ideas and details if they are to determine the key points made by the author?
  • What is the relationship between supporting details and the author’s reasons that support key points?
  • Can other prior knowledge (related to a particular piece of text) help students determine key points and the author’s reasons for them?
  • How does an author use words and illustrations to indicate and, then, support key ideas (or points) in a particular piece of text?
  • Why is it important for an author to provide reasons to support his or her points and why is it important for students to identify these reasons?
  • What are strategies that students can use to identify the author’s reasons for the points (key ideas) included in the selection?
  • How will mastery of this standard be assessed? What will students know and be able to do?


LEARNING PROGRESSION

Go to RI.1.8 to see the progression of related skills.