RI.K.3

With prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.

 


VOCABULARY
  • ideas
  • individuals (persons)
  • connections
  • alike
  • different

  • information
  • gathering information
  • key events
  • questioning

  • sequence
  • describe
  • identify
  • details

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD what's this

  • Students who are able to describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text can, with prompting and support, grow in their ability to use critical academic vocabulary words such as details, ideas, events, information, individuals (persons or characters), , identify, alike, different, text, connections, and describe.
  • Students who are able to, with prompting and support, describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text can, again with prompting and support, use rudimentary analysis skills to identify key details about individuals or event or ideas or pieces of information and determine if those key details are the same or different. For example, during a read-aloud, students can determine the connection between Stellaluna and the bird family by realizing that both bats and birds can fly or that bird mothers and bat mothers care for their babies.
  • When students can describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text, they have opportunities to integrate prior knowledge with text information in order to make connections.
  • Understanding connections between individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text is less difficult when students can act out, draw, or discuss (with prompting and support) various possible connections. For example, students can be helped to describe the connection between drag and flying in Fran Hodgkins and True Kelley’s How People Learned to Fly by performing the ?arm spinning experiment described in the text or when reading about dinosaurs students can discuss their favorite dinosaur and discuss how it is alike and different from another child’s favorite dinosaur…making pictures or models of favorite dinosaurs would add to the experience).
  • As the teacher provides prompting and support for students as they describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text, students practice question asking and answering techniques and the use of who, what, where, why, and when.
  • Students who are able to describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text are beginning to develop an awareness that informational text has various elements and structure.
  • The majority of texts read by students in upper elementary through high school are content-area related informational text selections rather than stories.
  • Determining various key components in sections of texts (events, ideas, individuals and other pieces of information) helps readers identify the main idea and supporting details in all texts across content and grade levels.
  • The ability to recognize and describe connections between various components of text such as individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information is essential to making meaning in beginning text, as well as text that is increasingly longer and more complex.
  • Recognizing that some details are more important than others helps young readers make appropriate connections that support comprehension.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION what's this
  • What vocabulary terms must students learn in order to describe connections between two individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in a text.
  • How does question asking and answering help young readers make connections between characters, events, ideas, and other pieces of information in text?
  • What strategies are effective to assist young readers recognize characters, events, ideas, and other pieces of information in informational text at their grade level.
  • How important is the ability to identify the main idea and supporting details to making connections between and among key components of informational text paragraphs.
  • How can read-alouds combined with think-alouds support young reader’s ability to identify key components in informational text paragraphs?
  • How will mastery of this standard be assessed? What will students know and be able to do?

 

LEARNING PROGRESSION

Go to RI.1.3 to see the progression of related skills.