SL.3.2

Determine the main ideas and supporting details of a text read aloud or information presented in diverse media and formats, including visually, quantitatively, and orally.

 


VOCABULARY

  • Analysis
  • Antagonist
  • Application
  • Author
  • Character
  • Clarification
  • Conditional Knowledge
  • Crisis / Climax
  • Declarative Knowledge
  • Evaluation
  • Explanations
  • Figurative

  • Inferences
  • Interpretation
  • Key Details
  • Location
  • Main Idea
  • Metacognitive
  • Metaphor
  • Modeling
  • Myth
  • Narrator
  • Perspective
  • Plot

  • Prior Knowledge
  • Procedural Knowledge
  • Protagonist
  • Self-questioning
  • Sensory Imagery
  • Sequencing
  • Setting
  • Storyline
  • Summary
  • Synthesis
  • Think Aloud

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD what's this
  • When listening to a text read aloud or receiving information presented by media or diverse formats (orally, quantitatively or visually), third graders question what they hear or see (what, where, why, when, who, and how). The answers to these questions help students clarify information in the read aloud text or from media information. Clarity of information helps students in their attempts determine the main idea and supporting details.
  • Third grade students who are exposed to a variety of sources of information (texts, media, and other diverse formats) on a regular basis are better prepared to comprehend the information they receive, orally, visually, and/or quantitatively.
  • Third grade students who can identify key ideas they hear as they listen to text or as they interact with media (visually, quantitatively, orally) can use those key ideas to determine the main idea of the information received.
  • Third grade students know how to connect visual or quantitative information to oral media text information. These connections help students identify key details. The identification of key details leads to the determination of the main idea. .
  • Third grade students who can distinguish relevant information from information that is not relevant are more easily able to determine key details and main idea of text that is read to them or that they acquire visually, quantitatively or orally from diverse media.
  • Students who are continually exposed to grade level read alouds of narrative as well as informational text develop active listening skills. These skills help them make meaning of what they hear. Making meaning is an important step in determining key details and main idea.
  • Third grade students understand that graphic organizers help them make a visual representation of the key details they identify when listening or from the information they acquire orally, quantitatively, and visually from diverse media. These visual representations help them use key details to identify the main idea. 
  • What skills must students have to be able to determine the main idea and supporting details of texts read aloud or information from media (orally, visually, or quantitatively)?
  • How can I observe comprehension or understanding through subtle or informal questioning?
  • What supporting tools can I use to help my students organize thoughts?
  • How do I foster an inquisitive environment that supports and validates students' questions and answers?
  • What strategies are most effective to help students identify the main idea and supporting details in media presentations whether those are oral, visual, quantitative or a combination?

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
what's this
  • How can I prompt my quiet or shy students to discuss key details or to ask questions frequently?
  • How can I observe comprehension or understanding through subtle or informal questioning?
  • What supporting tools can I use to help my students organize thoughts?
  • How do I foster an inquisitive environment that supports and validates students' questions and answers?


LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to SL.2.2 to see skills mastered prior to this.