RL.3.6

Distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters.

 


 VOCABULARY
  • point of view
  • opinion
  • objectivity

  • perspective
  • first person
  • interpretation

  • narrator
  • third person
  • evaluation

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD
what's this
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters are able to use terms like author, point of view, narrator, opinion, personal, evaluate, reason, evidence, and characters confidently and have expanded their academic vocabulary to include terms such as first and third person, perspective, rationale, and interpretation.
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters understand the difference between the narrator of a story and the author of a story. They know that the narrator is the story teller – the speaker or voice within the story from which the story is told – and that the author is a person outside the story who wrote the story.
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters understand that the narrator can be both the story teller and a character in the story (e.g. first person: I always wanted to climb to the top of Roan Mountain and one day….”) or just the story teller who tells the readers about the characters and what happens to them (e.g., third person: Hank lived at the foot of Roan Mountain and dreamed of climbing to the top. One day….”).
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters are able to use their personal experiences and background knowledge to make connections with the text. They find the text enjoyable or not, characters interesting or not, plot believable or not, story truthful or not and make decisions about text based on those personal experiences and background knowledge.
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters understand that their own point of view is personal. It is an opinion they have about the overall story and/or about specifics in the story: the setting, the characters, and the plot.
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters know that their point of view may be different from others in the class or in their group. With prompting and support, students are able to provide a reason (rationale) for their point of view and they are able to support their reason(s) using content from the text (e.g., “I didn’t like this book because…; the character didn’t seem real because…).
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters can describe their opinion of the text in writing and/or can engage in classroom discussions about the text and their opinions of it.
  • Students who are able to distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator or those of the characters may also be able to distinguish author's point of view (referring to the context in which the literacy work was written) from the point of view of characters or the narrator. They recognize and use key details about the story to determine the author’s purpose for writing the story and the message/lesson/moral the author wants the reader to receive. They further their understanding of the author’s point of view by “questioning the author” – (e.g. Why do you think the author wrote this story? How does the author feel about the outdoors? How do you know? Why do you think the author describe how huge and dangerous Roan Mountain is? Do you think the author liked Hank? How do you know? Do you think the author’s description of Hank’s ). With teacher guidance and support, they engage in author studies and gather information about the author that is relevant to their understanding the author’s point of view such as where the author was born or grew up or what the author has done or experienced as a child or adult that relates to the story, poem, or drama.
  • Understanding that the reader’s point of view is different from that of the characters in a story helps students develop the objectivity necessary to critically analyze and evaluate texts in all content areas.
  • Being able to distinguish one’s own point of view from that of the author or narrator can assist students in detecting literary bias, an important skill as students encounter increasingly complex texts.
  • Learning how to use an author’s clues to identify various points of view can give students ideas of how they can use these same literary devices in their own writing.    
  • Considering a story from multiple perspectives requires higher order thinking skills, such as making inferences, analyzing and evaluating, which are necessary for all content areas.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION what's this
  • How does the ability to question and seek answers help readers analyze texts, including the points of view of the narrator and characters, in order to formulate their own point of view?
  • How does understanding the author and the author’s use of text help students’ distinguish their own point of view from that of the narrator and other characters?
  • What academic vocabulary words (previously learned or newly introduced) are essential to support students understanding, discussing, and writing about their own point of view about text and how that might differ from that of the narrator and the characters?
  • What types of questions assist children in identifying their own perspective of text?
  • How can comparing the reader’s point of view to the points of view of characters in a story lead to deeper comprehension and sophisticated literary interpretations?

LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to RL.2.6 to see skills mastered prior to this.