RL.3.5

Refer to parts of stories, dramas, and poems when writing or speaking about a text, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza; describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections.

 


VOCABULARY
  • stories
  • dramas
  • poems

  • chapter
  • scene
  • stanza

  • describe
  • successive
  • sections

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD what's this
  • Third grade students are able to independently read stories, poems, and dramas within the 3rd grade complexity band.
  • When reading stories, poems and dramas, students can use dictionaries, glossaries and thesauruses both in print and online to determine shades of meanings in words read in stories and poems. Students expand their academic vocabulary with words such as chapter, scene, stanza, previous, successive, sections, chapter, and dramas and use these words correctly when writing or speaking about text.
  • When writing or speaking about a poem, students are able to describe how each stanza or line builds on its predecessor for meaning.
  • When students listen to a read-aloud of a novel, they are able, during class or group discussion, to note how each chapter connects to and builds earlier chapters. This task requires that students listen and read carefully.
  • When students read multiple poems together, they are able to explain their understanding of the poem, line-by-line and stanza-by-stanza, indicating how the previous line or stanza helps them understand successive lines or stanzas.
  • As students read chapter books, they are able to write the main idea of each chapter and use the main idea to predict what might happen in the following chapter. When checking their predictions at the end of each chapter, students note, either orally or in writing, how the main idea of the previous chapter provided a foundation for the chapter they are reading.
  • Students are able, with prompting and support at first, to rewrite stories and poems into simple dramas and vice versa. In rewriting simple stories into plays or poems and plays and poems into simple stories, students demonstrate their understanding of parts (stanza, chapters, scenes) of poems, stories, and dramas.
  • Verbally describing and writing about stories, dramas, and poems, while referring to parts such as chapters, scenes, and stanzas, supports oral language development, vocabulary acquisition, writing skills, and speaking and listening standards across grade levels.
  • Participating in the description and analysis of stories, dramas, and poems improves student understanding of their structure and helps students learn how to write these types of text.
  • Understanding how successive parts supply meaning and build plot development in stories, dramas, and poems can promote engagement with text and extension activities, such as theatrical readings and performances.
  • Being able to describe how each successive part of a story, drama, and poem builds on earlier sections will support higher levels of comprehension within the text and across a variety of texts, including informational texts in other content areas.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION
what's this
  • What strategies can be used to help children recognize and refer to parts of stories, dramas,
  • and poems, using terms such as chapter, scene, and stanza?
  • How does referring to parts of stories, dramas, and poems support the thinking, writing, and oral discussion of students in response to those texts?
  • In what ways does the ability to describe how each successive part builds on earlier sections help readers comprehend and analyze a story, drama, or poem?
  • What vocabulary and prior knowledge do students need to be able to refer to parts such as stanza, chapter, scene as they discuss and write about how successive parts of poems, stories, and drama build upon earlier sections.
  • Why is it important for students to discuss and write about their analysis of the parts (stanza, chapters, scenes) of poems, stories, and dramas.
  • How do oral recitations, choral reading, readers theatre, and dramatizations help students understand parts (stanza, chapters, scenes) of poems, stories, and dramas?
  • What materials (books, etc.) are available to support students learning to write about and discuss parts on stories, poems, and dramas?
  • What additional instructional support can be provided for students who struggle with recognizing parts of stories, dramas, and poems?


LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to RL.2.5 to see skills mastered prior to this.