RI.3.1

Ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of a text, referring explicitly to the text as the basis for the answers.

 


VOCABULARY
  • answers
  • questions
  • main idea
  • refer
  • evidence
  • support for answers
  • demonstrate
  • understanding
  • ask
  • answer
  • right there
  • search & find
  • thin question
  • thick question
  • summarize

(NOTE: A thin question refers to a factual “right there” question that has an answer that can be found right in the text and answered with a few words or a short sentence. The opposite term “thick question” refers to inferential questions that require reasoning from the reader.)


 UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD what's this
  • Students who can ask and answer questions to demonstrate understanding of text and can refer to specific text to support their answers and to craft their question, have acquired an extensive academic vocabulary related to text including terms such as text evidence, proof, thin questions, summarize, contract and compare, key details and main idea, visualize, infer, thick and thin questions and answers, connections, illustrations, digital and print text, and perceptions
  • When asking and answering questions about text, students demonstrate that they can explicitly locate evidence in the text to support answers and to craft questions of a factual nature (thin questions).
  • Students at this grade level are able to answer and ask both factual (thin) questions and inferential (thick) questions that require reasoning from the reader.
  • When asking and answering questions during class or small group discussions of text, students can connect responses to, and build on, what others have said.
  • When asking and answering questions during class or small group discussions of text, students demonstrate the ability to draw from personal experience and/or from other texts to provide further support to the evidence for answers found in the text.
  • Asking and answering questions about text prompts students to examine what information they lack or what parts of the text are confusing.
  • Students who are able to explicitly draw evidence from text to support answers and to formulate questions can begin to develop and manage basic research projects.
  • Students who are able to explicitly draw evidence from text to support answers can use that skill in writing in response to reading as well as in developing oral presentations.
  • Students who can quickly and confidently locate explicit information in text to support answers and questions demonstrate that they understand what they are reading and can identify key details and the main idea or message.
  • As students answer questions using explicit evidence found in text, they learn to summarize, rather than read text evidence word-for-word.
  • The types of questions asked by a reader suggest their level of understanding of a piece of text.
  • Questions closely linked with specific elements of text are likely to trigger answers that reveal the most information.
  • Paragraphs of a text are interwoven by an author to support its main idea.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION what's this
  • What are the elements of a good question? 
  • What is the relationship between the main idea and key supporting details?
  • What types of questions asked by a reader suggest their level of understanding of a piece of text?
  • How does the ability to question and locate answers in text help readers understand and analyze text?
  • What strategies can help students focus on the central message, the author’s purpose, and key details?
  • How does the ability to locate information in text to support questions and answers prepare students for writing projects, including research?
  • What strategies are use in teaching question asking and answering (i.e., reciprocal teaching; questioning the author; question and answer relationship)?
  • What cues can students learn to use to note relevant information (i.e., key details) in text for future reference when asking and answering questions about text?
  • What academic vocabulary must students have developed in order to ask and answer “ who, what, where, when, why and how” questions to demonstrate understanding about text, including being able to refer to text (print or illustrations) to support answers?


LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to RI.2.1 to see skills mastered prior to this.