RL.2.9

Compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures.

 


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Unpacking the Standard: RL.2.9
Student Friendly Learning Target: RL.2.9


VOCABULARY
 
  • Compare
  • Contrast
  • Versions

  • Similarities
  • Differences
  • Culture

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD
what's this 
  • In order to be able to compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures, students must acquire or have acquired an understanding of related vocabulary – culture, comparing, contrasting, similarities, differences, versions, and author as well as understand the concept of “the same story from different authors or from different cultures”. Students must also be familiar with the terms related to strategies they might use to compare and contrast such as questioning, connecting illustrations to print, determining key details, and so forth.
  • Students who are able to compare and contrast adventures and experiences of characters in familiar stories can, with teacher prompting and support, transfer this ability to the more complex task of comparing and contrasting two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures.
  • In order to be able to compare and contrast two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures, students should have already experienced multiple opportunities to read or listen to stories, drama, poems and myths from diverse cultures, from different authors, and from different time periods. These engagements with texts help students gain literary and cultural knowledge as well as familiarity with various text structures and elements.
  • Contrasting and comparing two or more versions of the same text by different authors or from different cultures requires students to use analysis skills to discern meaning of particular words, phrases, sentences and paragraphs to make connections among ideas across multiple texts.
  • Students can use their skills in asking and answering “who, what, where, when, why and how” questions as they compare and contrast two or more stories by the same author or from different cultures.
  • To compare and contrast two or more texts, students can use prior knowledge of characters, setting, and plot (major events) and the lesson/moral of the story to determine similarities and differences in these items.
  • Students use a range of strategies as they read to find similarities and differences in two or more versions of the same story by different authors or from different cultures including monitoring, searching, connecting and inferring to deepen their understanding of the author’s message in each of the texts.
  • Comparing and contrasting two or more versions of the same story, such as folktales and fables, from diverse cultures helps students begin to expand their knowledge of other cultures and countries.
  • “Comparison and synthesis of ideas across multiple texts allow students to thoroughly demonstrate reading comprehension as defined by the entirety of the reading standards. This type of reading is also essential when conducting research, when students build and present knowledge through integration, comparison and synthesis of ideas” (PARCC Model Content Frameworks, ELA/Literacy, Grade 3-11, November 2011, p. 9)
  • Comparing and contrasting is an important component of comprehension within the reading for literature experience across all grades.
  • The ability to identify similarities and differences can be applied to both literature and informational texts.
  • The ability to identify similarities and differences is useful across a variety of academic areas of study, including English Language Arts, Science, and Social Studies.
  • An understanding of different cultures is an important piece of Social Studies curriculum that focuses on world cultures and events

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION what's this 
  • What strategies are effective for moving students from contrasting and comparing characters experiences and adventures within a text to comparing and contrasting experiences and adventures of characters from two or more texts?
  • How can graphic organizers help students compare and contrast two or more texts by the same author or from different cultures?
  • What activities, such as author’s study, can help students compare and contrast texts?
  • How can teachers ensure that students have the level of academic vocabulary necessary to successfully meet this standard?
  • What are books and materials that support the ability of students to compare and contrast two are more texts (e.g versions of Stone Soup; Little Red Riding Hood & Little Red Cowboy Hat)
  • What roles do story illustrations and personal background knowledge play in supporting the ability of students to compare and contrast two or more texts from the same author or different cultures?

LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to RL.1.9 to see skills mastered prior to this.
Go to RL.3.9 to see the progression of related skills.