RI.2.3

Describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text.

 


VOCABULARY
  • ideas
  • concepts
  • procedure
  • scientific ideas
  • describe
  • sequential (order)
  • parallel

  • historical events
  • steps
  • series of events
  • connection
  • series
  • technical procedures

UNDERSTANDING THE STANDARD
  what's this 
  • Key details about a topic can be discovered by asking who, what, where, when, why, and how.
  • Pieces of text are often separated into parts called paragraphs.
  • In many cases, several paragraphs are associated with a single topic.
  • Every paragraph revolves around a particular point or idea.
  • Separate events, ideas, and procedures are organized to help a reader make sense of them.
  • Students who are able to describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text have prior knowledge of, and can use, critical academic vocabulary words such as connections, details, ideas, information, events, identify, questioning (question answering and asking), similarities, differences and describe. They learn and practice using new vocabulary such as evidence, procedures, historical, scientific, technical, and series.
  • Students who are able to describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text study the organization of the texts, including the key ideas in, and main purposes of, paragraphs or brief sections. They use what they find to chart the information from the paragraphs/sections within the text to determine connections.
  • Students who are able to describe the connection between a series of historical events, scientific ideas or concepts, or steps in technical procedures in a text are able to determine connections in the text that parallel each other as well as connections that are sequential.
  • Students who are able to describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information understand that asking and answering questions (who, why, what, where, and when) about key details gives them clues to connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information.
  • As students describe the connection between two individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text, they use relevant prior knowledge to help them make those connections.
  • Understanding connections between individuals, events, ideas or pieces of information in a text is less difficult when students act out, draw, or discuss various possible connections. For example, by placing events from a similar time period on a timeline, students are able to see and make connections among the events.
  • Students who can describe how one event connects with the other begin to realize that one “thing” may cause another “thing” to happen. In addition to using compare and contrast, they are introduced to the idea of cause and effect
  • When students describe connections between individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information and are prompted and guided to tell why they made the connections by referring to the text, they are practicing skills that support writing, research, and public speaking.

QUESTIONS TO FOCUS INSTRUCTION   what's this 
  • What are the best questions to ask or keep in mind when examining a piece of text?
  • How are paragraphs used by the author in a piece of text?
  • What are some ways to represent a series of events, a collection of ideas, or a set of procedures?
  • What are the academic vocabulary requirements that enable students to make and, then, describe connections between a series of individuals, events, ideas, or pieces of information in text?


LEARNING PROGRESSION
Go to RI.1.3 to see skills mastered prior to this.
Go to RI.3.3 to see the progression of related skills.